IBM XIV Mobile Dashboard is in the Apple Store

For those of you with Apple iPads, you might consider dropping by the Apple Store and picking up your free IBM XIV Mobile Dashboard.

The IBM XIV Mobile Dashboard application can be used to securely monitor the performance and health of your XIV over a Wi-Fi or 3G link.    Having downloaded and installed the Mobile Dashboard you will get a lovely XIV Icon:

When you start the Mobile Dashboard you will have the choice to either run in Demo Mode or to connect to an actual XIV. Demo mode can be accessed by selecting the Demo Mode option deep in the lower right hand corner.  So you don’t actually need an XIV to give it a test drive.

To logon to a real XIV you will need a valid username, password and IP address.

Once connected you have the choice of viewing volume performance or host performance. If you view (hold) the iPad in portrait mode you get a list of up to 27 volumes or hosts ordered by performance metrics (it defaults to ordering by IOPS).   If you view the iPad in landscape mode you will get a more graphical output (as per the examples below).  There are no options to perform configuration, the dashboard is intended only for monitoring. This means each panel will show the performance and redundancy state of the XIV.

Volume performance

The volume performance panel is shown by default. The example below shows the output when the iPad is operated in landscape mode.   From this panel you can see up to 120 seconds worth of performance for a highlighted volume. Use your finger to rotate the arrow on the blue volume icon to switch the display between IOPS, bandwidth (in megabytes per second or MBps) and latency (in milliseconds or MS). The data redundancy state of the XIV is shown in the upper right hand corner (in this example it is in Full Redundancy, but it could be Rebuilding or Redistributing).

The example above shows the output when the iPad is operated in landscape mode.  If you instead rotate the iPad to portrait mode, you will get a list of the performance of up to 27 of your busiest volumes.

Now swipe to the left to navigate to the Hosts panel as shown below.

From this panel you can see up to 120 seconds worth of performance for a highlighted host. Use your finger to rotate the arrow on the purple host icon to switch the display between IOPS, bandwidth (in megabytes per second or MBps) and latency (in milliseconds or MS). The data redundancy state of the XIV is shown in the upper right hand corner (in this example it is in Full Redundancy, but it could potentially also be Rebuilding or Redistributing). Swipe to the right to navigate to the Volumes panel.

The example above shows the output when the iPad is operated in landscape mode.  If you instead rotate the iPad to portrait mode, you will get a list of the performance of up to 27 of your busiest hosts.

From either the volumes or the hosts panels you can log off from the mobile dashboard using the icon in the upper right hand-most corner of the display.  When you log back on, the last used XIV IP address and username will be displayed (but not the password which will need to be entered again).

I can see some nice use cases here.   You get a call regarding performance but you are on the road.  Are there any problems with the XIV?   You can quickly logon with your iPad and confirm if response times are normal and the redundancy state is Full Redundancy.

A better use case…  now you can ask your manager to buy you an iPad, so you can monitor your XIV!    Let me know how that goes    #:-)

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About Anthony Vandewerdt

I am an IT Professional who lives and works in Melbourne Australia. This blog is totally my own work. It does not represent the views of any corporation. Constructive and useful comments are very very welcome.
This entry was posted in IBM XIV and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to IBM XIV Mobile Dashboard is in the Apple Store

  1. Pingback: Get the IBM XIV Mobile Dashboard in the Apple Store | Storage CH Blog

  2. perthitblog says:

    Just need one for SVC/V7000 now.

  3. Pingback: XIV Performance Monitoring Tools | Aussie Storage Blog

  4. Pingback: XIV Performance Monitoring Tools « Storage CH Blog

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